Aswat Asharq Al-Awsat :

Aswat Asharq Al-Awsat : Dbeibah: Libya Under Threat of Division, Facing Great Danger

Head of Libya’s GNU Abdulhamid al-Dbeibah in Tripoli, Libya on November 21, 2021. (AFP/Getty Images)
Head of Libya’s GNU Abdulhamid al-Dbeibah in Tripoli, Libya on November 21, 2021. (AFP/Getty Images)
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Dbeibah: Libya Under Threat of Division, Facing Great Danger

Head of Libya’s GNU Abdulhamid al-Dbeibah in Tripoli, Libya on November 21, 2021. (AFP/Getty Images)
Head of Libya’s GNU Abdulhamid al-Dbeibah in Tripoli, Libya on November 21, 2021. (AFP/Getty Images)

Head of Libya’s Government of National Unity Abdulhamid al-Dbeibah warned that the country is facing the threat of division and coming up against a “great danger.”

During the opening of a mosque in al-Asbiah city on Friday, he said: “Some parties want to divide the country for the sake of a few crumbs, funds and fortunes.”

“We declare that the country will remain one and united even if it means dying for it,” he added.

Addressing Libya’s enemies, whom he didn’t identify, he stated: “They want to take us back, but I say to them that we will never return to the dark days when we used to fight each other.”

“Those who let us live in darkness in the past ten years want to continue to do so,” he remarked.

Turning to the economy, Dbeibah said the situation was “good” and that Libya was producing a surplus of oil.

Furthermore, he held the central bank responsible for the liquidity crisis, calling on it to “radically” change its policies at banks, which are in turn exploiting the situation in the country.

Dbeibah said he has no authority over them.



Aswat Asharq Al-Awsat : Two Attacks by Yemen's Houthis Strike Ships in Red Sea

FILE PHOTO: Greek-flagged bulk cargo vessel Sea Champion is docked to the port of Aden, Yemen to which it arrived after being attacked in the Red Sea, February 21, 2024. REUTERS/Fawaz Salman/File Photo
FILE PHOTO: Greek-flagged bulk cargo vessel Sea Champion is docked to the port of Aden, Yemen to which it arrived after being attacked in the Red Sea, February 21, 2024. REUTERS/Fawaz Salman/File Photo
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Two Attacks by Yemen's Houthis Strike Ships in Red Sea

FILE PHOTO: Greek-flagged bulk cargo vessel Sea Champion is docked to the port of Aden, Yemen to which it arrived after being attacked in the Red Sea, February 21, 2024. REUTERS/Fawaz Salman/File Photo
FILE PHOTO: Greek-flagged bulk cargo vessel Sea Champion is docked to the port of Aden, Yemen to which it arrived after being attacked in the Red Sea, February 21, 2024. REUTERS/Fawaz Salman/File Photo

Two attacks by Yemen’s Houthi militias targeted ships in the Red Sea on Monday.

Three small Houthi vessels, two of which were crewed and another uncrewed, attacked the MT Bently I off the coast of Hodeidah, Yemen, according to British authorities.
The “reported unmanned small craft collided with the vessel twice and the 2 manned small craft fired at the vessel," the British military’s United Kingdom Maritime Trade Operations center reported.

“The vessel conducted self-protection measures, after 15 minutes the small craft aborted the attack."

The captain later reported three separate waves of missile attacks that exploded in close proximity to the vessel.

Later on Monday, in a separate incident off the same coast, the MT Chios Lion, an oil tanker, was attacked by an uncrewed Houthi aerial vehicle, which “impacted on the port side causing some damage and light smoke,” the UKMTO said.

Both ships and all crew were reported safe, the UKMTO said in a warning to mariners.

Late Monday, the Houthis claimed responsibility for the attacks on Bently I and Chios Lion.

Early Tuesday, the US Central Command confirmed the attacks and identified the names and flags of the ship.

Also on Monday, the Central Command said CENTCOM forces successfully destroyed five Iranian-backed Houthi uncrewed aerial vehicles (UAV), three over the Red Sea and two over Houthi-controlled areas of Yemen.

The militias claimed on Thursday targeting more than 166 vessels since November.

The Houthis maintain that their attacks target ships linked to Israel, the United States or Britain, as part of the militias’ support for Hamas in its war against Israel. However, many of the ships attacked have little or no connection to the war.