Aswat Asharq Al-Awsat :

Aswat Asharq Al-Awsat : Saudi Ministry of Culture Launches Camel Studies Grant

Saudi Ministry of Culture Launches Camel Studies Grant
TT

Saudi Ministry of Culture Launches Camel Studies Grant

Saudi Ministry of Culture Launches Camel Studies Grant

The Saudi Ministry of Culture, in partnership with the Ministry of Environment, Water, and Agriculture, launched the Camel Studies Grant, which aims to shine a light on the vital role camels play in Saudi Arabia's cultural, social, and economic fields through scientific research.

The grant welcomes proposals exploring various aspects of camel significance, encompassing historical, cultural, social, economic, environmental, and health dimensions, reported the Saudi Press Agency on Monday.

The historical field encourages research that preserves the rich cultural heritage surrounding camels. This includes studies comparing the importance of camels across civilizations, historical and ethnographic analysis of camel-related traditions, and exploration of archival methods for safeguarding this heritage.

The cultural field focuses on the artistic and literary representation of camels. Researchers can delve into critical and literary studies on camels in Arabic and Saudi literature, including children's books. The field welcomes studies on camel-related vocabulary and their portrayal in various artistic mediums, from visual and cinematic arts to engravings and sculptures.

The social field investigates the place of camels in Arab and Islamic societies. Research can explore the local significance of camels, their social impact, traditions associated with ownership, and the influence of national camel events on communities, both locally and globally.

The economic field examines the economic contributions of camels and products derived from them. Researchers can analyze the use of camel wool and leather in fashion and furniture industries. The field encourages studies on sustaining the economic viability of camel products and measuring the financial impact of camel festivals and related institutions.

The environmental field focuses on the impact of camels on the environment. Research can explore sustainable land-use for camel grazing, analyze carbon dioxide emissions, and investigate the role of camels in maintaining ecological balance in arid lands.

The health field delves into the potential health benefits of camel products. Researchers can investigate the medical and therapeutic applications of these products. The field welcomes studies on developing technologies for measuring camel meat quality and projects focusing on camel breed preservation and genetic mapping.

The launch of the Camel Studies Grant coincides with the UN declaration of 2024 as the International Year of Camelids. It also celebrates the Kingdom's designation of 2024 as the Year of the Camel.



Aswat Asharq Al-Awsat : Cyprus Displays Jewelry, Early Christian Icons and Bronze Age Antiquities Once Looted From Island

A presidential security officer stands behind antiquities repatriated from Germany and put on display at the Archeological museum, in capital Nicosia, Cyprus, Monday, July 22, 2024. (AP Photo/Petros Karadjias)
A presidential security officer stands behind antiquities repatriated from Germany and put on display at the Archeological museum, in capital Nicosia, Cyprus, Monday, July 22, 2024. (AP Photo/Petros Karadjias)
TT

Cyprus Displays Jewelry, Early Christian Icons and Bronze Age Antiquities Once Looted From Island

A presidential security officer stands behind antiquities repatriated from Germany and put on display at the Archeological museum, in capital Nicosia, Cyprus, Monday, July 22, 2024. (AP Photo/Petros Karadjias)
A presidential security officer stands behind antiquities repatriated from Germany and put on display at the Archeological museum, in capital Nicosia, Cyprus, Monday, July 22, 2024. (AP Photo/Petros Karadjias)

Cyprus on Monday put on display artifacts — some of them thousands of years old — that were returned after a Turkish art dealer looted them from the ethnically divided island nation decades ago.
Aydin Dikmen took the artifacts from the country's breakaway north in the years after Cyprus’ split in 1974, when Turkiye invaded following a coup mounted by supporters of union with Greece. The antiquities were kept in Germany after authorities there seized them in 1997, and protracted legal battles secured their repatriation in three batches, the last one this year.
Addressing the unveiling ceremony at Cyprus' archaeological museum, President Nikos Christodoulides said the destruction of a country’s cultural heritage as evidenced in recent conflicts becomes a “deliberate campaign of cultural and religious cleansing that aims to eliminate identity.”
Among the 60 most recently returned artifacts put on display include jewelry from the Chalcolithic Period between 3500-1500 B.C. and Bronze Age bird-shaped idols.
Antiquities that Dikmen also looted but were returned years ago include 1,500-year-old mosaics of Saints Luke, Mark, Matthew and James. They are among the few examples of early Christian works to survive the Iconoclastic period in the 8th and 9th centuries when most such works were destroyed.
Cyprus' authorities and the country's Orthodox Church for decades have been hunting for the island’s looted antiquities and centuries-old relics from as many as 500 churches in open auctions and on the black market.
The museum's antiquities curator, Eftychia Zachariou, told the ceremony that Cyprus in recent years has benefited from a shift in thinking among authorities in many countries who now opt to repatriate antiquities of dubious provenance.