Aswat Asharq Al-Awsat :

Aswat Asharq Al-Awsat : Baramah to Aswat Asharq Al-Awsatt: Sudan War Lacks Clear Purpose or Justification

Sudan’s National Umma Party Chairperson Fadlallah Baramah (Aswat Asharq Al-Awsatt)
Sudan’s National Umma Party Chairperson Fadlallah Baramah (Aswat Asharq Al-Awsatt)
TT

Baramah to Aswat Asharq Al-Awsatt: Sudan War Lacks Clear Purpose or Justification

Sudan’s National Umma Party Chairperson Fadlallah Baramah (Aswat Asharq Al-Awsatt)
Sudan’s National Umma Party Chairperson Fadlallah Baramah (Aswat Asharq Al-Awsatt)

The leader of Sudan’s National Umma Party, Fadlallah Baramah, described the signing of the “Addis Ababa Declaration” between the Civil Democratic Forces Alliance (Tagaddum) and the Rapid Support Forces (RSF) as a “preliminary step on the right path towards peace.”

He deemed it a “political and military opportunity to reach a final resolution for the Sudanese crisis.”

Speaking to Aswat Asharq Al-Awsatt in the Ethiopian capital, Addis Ababa, Baramah characterized the conflict that erupted in Sudan on April 15, 2023, as distinct from previous wars in the country.

He emphasized, in the remarks published Friday, that this war lacks a clear objective and has surpassed both in human and material losses all preceding conflicts.

Baramah leads one of Sudan’s largest political parties, the National Umma Party, and is a military veteran who previously served as the Northeast African country’s Minister of Defense.

Drawing on his military expertise, Baramah drew comparisons between the current war involving the Sudanese army and the RSF and previous wars.

He pointed out that the South Sudan War, known as the “Torit mutiny” from August 1955 to 1962, concluded with the Addis Ababa Agreement in 1973 led by General Joseph Lagu.

Baramah recalled the history of conflict witnessed by Sudan, including the war led by John Garang de Mabior (1983-2005), the Nuba Mountains War led by Yousif Kuwa and Telfal Kokor (1985), and the Darfur War (2003-2020).

All these conflicts did not result in the same level of loss of life and infrastructure damage as the current war, noted Baramah.

“This war must come to a halt, as it has inflicted unprecedented harm on lives, people, and infrastructure over nine months, unlike any of the previous wars that lasted 51 years,” he asserted.

“Thousands have lost their lives, millions have been displaced and uprooted, and there has been unparalleled destruction to infrastructure – destruction that is challenging to repair.”

“For instance, the destroyed Jili Petroleum Refinery (north of Bahri city in the capital Khartoum) requires five billion dollars for reconstruction (its initial construction cost was two billion dollars), and the Shambat Bridge needs millions, in addition to other private and public facilities,” clarified Baramah.

Baramah observed that the current Sudanese war is “without cause,” unlike the preceding conflicts in Sudan.

“All previous wars had their reasons and justifications, but this war is unjustifiable,” he told Aswat Asharq Al-Awsatt.

“The South Sudan War, for instance, stemmed from the Southerners’ rightful demand for federal governance and later independence, a legitimate demand. The rest of the wars were about citizens’ rights to wealth and power," explained Baramah.

Expressing concern, Baramah warned about the catastrophic consequences of this war, describing them as perilous.

“This war has brought us to a dangerous stage, marked by the proliferation of hate speech, which is more destructive than the destruction of infrastructure because it leads to the destruction of Sudan,” he cautioned.



Aswat Asharq Al-Awsat : Siddiq al-Mahdi: Sudanese Public Unites on Need to End War

Secretary-General of the Sudanese Coordination of Civil Democratic Forces (Taqaddum), Siddiq al-Mahdi (Aswat Asharq Al-Awsatt)
Secretary-General of the Sudanese Coordination of Civil Democratic Forces (Taqaddum), Siddiq al-Mahdi (Aswat Asharq Al-Awsatt)
TT

Siddiq al-Mahdi: Sudanese Public Unites on Need to End War

Secretary-General of the Sudanese Coordination of Civil Democratic Forces (Taqaddum), Siddiq al-Mahdi (Aswat Asharq Al-Awsatt)
Secretary-General of the Sudanese Coordination of Civil Democratic Forces (Taqaddum), Siddiq al-Mahdi (Aswat Asharq Al-Awsatt)

Siddiq al-Mahdi, Secretary-General of the Sudanese Coordination of Civil Democratic Forces (Taqaddum), stressed the urgent need for humanitarian aid to Sudanese citizens suffering from the ongoing conflict.

In an interview with Aswat Asharq Al-Awsatt in Addis Ababa, al-Mahdi criticized the National Congress Party for manipulating its alliance with the military to advance its political goals.

Al-Mahdi said he would only engage in the political process if the party ends its connection with the military and security forces.

He highlighted a growing recognition of the need to end the war, noting a shift away from military solutions as a positive sign of Sudanese public opinion converging on the need for peace.

The Taqaddum official said this change has reduced support for the war and increased regional and international calls for its end.

Al-Mahdi warned that the war has caused a severe humanitarian crisis and poses threats to the region, neighboring countries, the Horn of Africa, and Red Sea security.

“The need to stop the war is now urgent, and we must act on this,” he said.

He praised international efforts, including the Paris and Cairo conferences and the UN's attempts to bring the warring sides together in Geneva for aid and protection.

Al-Mahdi also revealed that his coalition had proposed a plan to the military and Rapid Support Forces, focusing on humanitarian aid, political arrangements to end the war, and a transition to civilian democracy.

He stressed that the humanitarian situation cannot wait for the war to end.

“Providing aid and protecting citizens are urgent priorities. We need to act now to deliver aid, even before the war ends,” he said.

He noted that the best approach involves coordinating initiatives from various platforms, including Jeddah, IGAD, and its key member states Ethiopia, Kenya, and Uganda, as well as Bahrain, the UAE, Egypt, the African Union, and the United Nations.

Al-Mahdi emphasized that all these entities are working on humanitarian and peace efforts.

He stated that any alignment among mediators, conflict parties, and civil components is viewed by Taqaddum as a comprehensive process for achieving peace.