Aswat Asharq Al-Awsat :

Aswat Asharq Al-Awsat : Direct Int’l Communication Traffic via stc Network Increases by 81% During Hajj

stc Group said that it worked this year to increase the capacity of the data network. SPA
stc Group said that it worked this year to increase the capacity of the data network. SPA
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Direct Int’l Communication Traffic via stc Network Increases by 81% During Hajj

stc Group said that it worked this year to increase the capacity of the data network. SPA
stc Group said that it worked this year to increase the capacity of the data network. SPA

stc Group announced Monday that direct international communication traffic during this Hajj season increased by 81% from last year.
The use of social media applications increased by 65%, according to the group, with Snapchat, WhatsApp and Facebook taking the lead. These social media applications enhance the pilgrims’ digital experience and facilitates their connection with their families.
stc Group said that it worked this year to increase the capacity of the data network through partnerships with prominent global service providers such as BICs, Syniverse, and Orange to increase the speed and quality of communication.

The company also strengthened its network by spreading more than 1,900 Wi-Fi points to enhance communication between pilgrims and their families.

stc Group had in place a comprehensive plan for the Hajj season that included major improvements to infrastructure, and modern digital services to pilgrims, such as augmented reality (AR) glasses supported by AI and connected to 5G network, which provide pilgrims with information in several , and smooth moving from one place to another through interaction with AI applications.
It also enables them to locate their companions, and get information about the holy sites using voice commands.

The group provides a service that enables pilgrims to communicate with their families through cabins that support high-resolution and high-speed video calls, available to everyone.



Aswat Asharq Al-Awsat : Google Scraps Plan to Remove Cookies from Chrome

FILED - 09 January 2024, US, Las Vegas: The Google logo can be seen on the Internet company's pavilion at the CES technology trade fair. Photo: Andrej Sokolow/dpa
FILED - 09 January 2024, US, Las Vegas: The Google logo can be seen on the Internet company's pavilion at the CES technology trade fair. Photo: Andrej Sokolow/dpa
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Google Scraps Plan to Remove Cookies from Chrome

FILED - 09 January 2024, US, Las Vegas: The Google logo can be seen on the Internet company's pavilion at the CES technology trade fair. Photo: Andrej Sokolow/dpa
FILED - 09 January 2024, US, Las Vegas: The Google logo can be seen on the Internet company's pavilion at the CES technology trade fair. Photo: Andrej Sokolow/dpa

Google is planning to keep third-party cookies in its Chrome browser, it said on Monday, after years of pledging to phase out the tiny packets of code meant to track users on the internet.
The major reversal follows concerns from advertisers - the company's biggest source of income - saying the loss of cookies in the world's most popular browser will limit their ability to collect information for personalizing ads, making them dependent on Google's user databases, Reuters reported.
The UK's Competition and Markets Authority had also scrutinized Google's plan over concerns it would impede competition in digital advertising.
"Instead of deprecating third-party cookies, we would introduce a new experience in Chrome that lets people make an informed choice that applies across their web browsing, and they'd be able to adjust that choice at any time," Anthony Chavez, vice president of the Google-backed Privacy Sandbox initiative, said in a blog post.
Since 2019, the Alphabet unit has been working on the Privacy Sandbox initiative aimed at enhancing online privacy while supporting digital businesses, with a key goal being the phase-out of third-party cookies.
Cookies are packets of information that allow websites and advertisers to identify individual web surfers and track their browsing habits, but they can also be used for unwanted surveillance.
In the European Union, the use of cookies is governed by the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), which stipulates that publishers secure explicit consent from users to store their cookies. Major browsers also give the option to delete cookies on command.
Chavez said Google was working with regulators such as the UK's CMA and Information Commissioner's Office as well as publishers and privacy groups on the new approach, while continuing to invest in the Privacy Sandbox program.
The announcement drew mixed reactions.
"Advertising stakeholders will no longer have to prepare to quit third-party cookies cold turkey," eMarketer analyst Evelyn Mitchell-Wolf said in a statement.
Lena Cohen, staff technologist at the Electronic Frontier Foundation, said cookies can lead to consumer harm, for instance predatory ads that target vulnerable groups. "Google's decision to continue allowing third-party cookies, despite other major browsers blocking them for years, is a direct consequence of their advertising-driven business model," Cohen said in a statement.