Aswat Asharq Al-Awsat :

Aswat Asharq Al-Awsat : Couple Rescued from Desert Near California's Joshua Tree National Park after Running Out of Water

This still image from video provided by the Riverside County Sheriff’s Office shows two hikers lying on the ground as Riverside County Sheriff’s Aviation Unit’s Rescue 9 was dispatched to the Ladder Canyon Trail in Mecca, Calif., to assist the hikers, who were requesting medical aid, June 9, 2024. The couple, hiking in the desert south of Joshua Tree National Park in Southern California, was rescued after running out of water. The Riverside County Sheriff’s Office says a man called 911 and reported that his girlfriend was dehydrated and weak. (Riverside County Sheriff’s Office via AP)
This still image from video provided by the Riverside County Sheriff’s Office shows two hikers lying on the ground as Riverside County Sheriff’s Aviation Unit’s Rescue 9 was dispatched to the Ladder Canyon Trail in Mecca, Calif., to assist the hikers, who were requesting medical aid, June 9, 2024. The couple, hiking in the desert south of Joshua Tree National Park in Southern California, was rescued after running out of water. The Riverside County Sheriff’s Office says a man called 911 and reported that his girlfriend was dehydrated and weak. (Riverside County Sheriff’s Office via AP)
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Couple Rescued from Desert Near California's Joshua Tree National Park after Running Out of Water

This still image from video provided by the Riverside County Sheriff’s Office shows two hikers lying on the ground as Riverside County Sheriff’s Aviation Unit’s Rescue 9 was dispatched to the Ladder Canyon Trail in Mecca, Calif., to assist the hikers, who were requesting medical aid, June 9, 2024. The couple, hiking in the desert south of Joshua Tree National Park in Southern California, was rescued after running out of water. The Riverside County Sheriff’s Office says a man called 911 and reported that his girlfriend was dehydrated and weak. (Riverside County Sheriff’s Office via AP)
This still image from video provided by the Riverside County Sheriff’s Office shows two hikers lying on the ground as Riverside County Sheriff’s Aviation Unit’s Rescue 9 was dispatched to the Ladder Canyon Trail in Mecca, Calif., to assist the hikers, who were requesting medical aid, June 9, 2024. The couple, hiking in the desert south of Joshua Tree National Park in Southern California, was rescued after running out of water. The Riverside County Sheriff’s Office says a man called 911 and reported that his girlfriend was dehydrated and weak. (Riverside County Sheriff’s Office via AP)

A couple hiking in the desert south of Joshua Tree National Park in Southern California was rescued after running out of water, authorities said.

On Sunday, the man called 911 and reported that his girlfriend was dehydrated and weak, according to a statement from the Riverside County Sheriff’s Office posted Monday on social media, The AP reported.

A search and rescue helicopter crew was dispatched on June 9, when temperatures reached triple digits, to the area known as Painted Canyon and found the couple huddled in a dry creek bed, the office said.

A video posted online by the Sheriff's Office shows the helicopter hovering above the couple lying on the desert floor, with the man trying to shield her with his body from the blazing sun and wind. The man and woman were then hoisted into the helicopter one by one.

The couple was flown to a landing zone where an aeromedical helicopter rushed the woman to a hospital “due to her severe condition,” according to Riverside County Sheriff’s Office Aviation Unit’s Rescue 9 post. The man was transported to a local hospital by ambulance, the sheriff’s office told SFGATE.

The deserts of Southern California are among the hottest areas in the state. On June 9, weather stations near the Painted Canyon area saw highs ranging from 100 to 105 degrees Fahrenheit (37.8 to 40.6 Celsius), according to the National Weather Service.

“Please remember as the temps increase take more water than you think you will need, have a hiking plan, and tell two people where you are going,” the Sheriff’s Department said.



Aswat Asharq Al-Awsat : 3 Hikers Die in Utah Parks as Temperatures Hit Triple Digits

(FILES) The view from the Grand View Point Outlook in the Canyonlands National Park near Moab, Utah on April 24, 2018. (Photo by Mark Ralston / AFP)
(FILES) The view from the Grand View Point Outlook in the Canyonlands National Park near Moab, Utah on April 24, 2018. (Photo by Mark Ralston / AFP)
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3 Hikers Die in Utah Parks as Temperatures Hit Triple Digits

(FILES) The view from the Grand View Point Outlook in the Canyonlands National Park near Moab, Utah on April 24, 2018. (Photo by Mark Ralston / AFP)
(FILES) The view from the Grand View Point Outlook in the Canyonlands National Park near Moab, Utah on April 24, 2018. (Photo by Mark Ralston / AFP)

Three hikers died over the weekend in suspected heat-related cases at state and national parks in Utah, including a father and daughter who got lost on a strenuous hike in Canyonlands National Park in triple-digit temperatures.
The daughter, 23, and her father, 52, sent a 911 text alerting dispatchers that they were lost and had run out of water while hiking the 8.1 miles (13 kilometers) Syncline Loop, described by the National Park Service as the most challenging trail in the Island in the Sky district of the southeast Utah park. The pair set out Friday to navigate steep switchbacks and scramble through boulder fields with limited trail markers as the air temperature surpassed 100 degrees Fahrenheit (38 degrees Celsius).
Park rangers and a helicopter crew with the Bureau of Land Management began their search for the lost hikers in the early evening Friday, but found them already dead. The San Juan County Sheriff’s Office identified them on Monday as Albino Herrera Espinoza and his daughter, Beatriz Herrera, of Green Bay, Wisconsin.
Due to the jagged terrain, safety officials used a helicopter to airlift the bodies out of the park and to the state medical examiner on Saturday morning, according to the sheriff's office. Their deaths are being investigated as heat-related by the local sheriff and the National Park Service, The Associated Press reported.
Later Saturday, first responders in southwest Utah responded to a call about two hikers “suffering from a heat related incident” at Snow Canyon State Park, which is known for its lava tubes, sand dunes and a canyon carved from red and white Navajo Sandstone.
A multi-agency search team found and treated two hikers who were suffering from heat exhaustion. While they were treating those individuals, a passing hiker informed them of an unconscious person nearby. First responders found the 30-year-old woman dead, public safety officials said.
Her death is being investigated by the Santa Clara-Ivins Public Safety Department. She has not been identified publicly.
Tourists continue to flock to parks in Utah and other southwestern states during the hottest months of the year, even as officials caution that hiking in extreme heat poses serious health risks.
A motorcyclist died earlier this month in Death Valley National Park in eastern California, and another motorcyclist was taken to a hospital for severe heat illness. Both were part of a group that rode through the Badwater Basin area amid scorching weather.
The air temperature in Death Valley reached at least 125 degrees Fahrenheit (52 degrees Celsius) for nine consecutive days July 4-12 — the park’s longest streak at or above that temperature since the early 1900s, the National Park Service announced Monday. Now, parts of the park are experiencing a multiday power outage triggered by a thunderstorm as temperatures continue to linger just above 120 degrees Fahrenheit (49 degrees Celsius).
Late last month, a Texas man died while hiking in Grand Canyon National Park, where summer temperatures on exposed parts of the trails can reach over 120 degrees Fahrenheit.
Elsewhere on Monday, authorities said a 61-year-old man was found dead inside his motor home in eastern Washington state. The man likely died Wednesday when the temperature in the area reached 108 degrees Fahrenheit (42 degrees Celsius), Franklin County Coroner Curtis McGary said.
Authorities also suspected heat in the death of an 81-year-old man Saturday in Oregon but have released no further details. His death brings the state's tally of suspected heat-related deaths to 17 since the July 4 weekend, The Oregonian/Oregonlive.com reported.