Aswat Asharq Al-Awsat :

Aswat Asharq Al-Awsat : Shipping Industry Urges Red Sea Action as Houthis Sink Second Vessel

File photo: A handout photo made available by the Yemeni Al-Joumhouriya TV shows the last part of the British-registered cargo vessel, Rubymar, sinking in the Red Sea off the coast of Yemen, 03 March 2024 (issued 07 March 2024). EPA/Yemeni Al-Joumhouriya TV
File photo: A handout photo made available by the Yemeni Al-Joumhouriya TV shows the last part of the British-registered cargo vessel, Rubymar, sinking in the Red Sea off the coast of Yemen, 03 March 2024 (issued 07 March 2024). EPA/Yemeni Al-Joumhouriya TV
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Shipping Industry Urges Red Sea Action as Houthis Sink Second Vessel

File photo: A handout photo made available by the Yemeni Al-Joumhouriya TV shows the last part of the British-registered cargo vessel, Rubymar, sinking in the Red Sea off the coast of Yemen, 03 March 2024 (issued 07 March 2024). EPA/Yemeni Al-Joumhouriya TV
File photo: A handout photo made available by the Yemeni Al-Joumhouriya TV shows the last part of the British-registered cargo vessel, Rubymar, sinking in the Red Sea off the coast of Yemen, 03 March 2024 (issued 07 March 2024). EPA/Yemeni Al-Joumhouriya TV

Urgent action must be taken in the Red Sea to stop attacks on merchant shipping by Yemen's Houthis, leading industry groups said on Wednesday, after the sinking of a second ship.

Iran-aligned Houthi militants first launched drone and missile strikes on the important trade route in November in what they say is solidarity with Palestinians in Gaza. In more than 70 attacks, they have also seized one vessel and its crew and killed at least three seafarers.

"It is deplorable that innocent seafarers are being attacked while simply performing their jobs, vital jobs which keep the world warm, fed, and clothed," Reuters quoted the world's top shipping associations saying in a joint statement.

"These attacks must stop now. We call for states with influence in the region to safeguard our innocent seafarers and for the swift de-escalation of the situation in the Red Sea."

The Greek-owned Tutor coal carrier attacked by Yemen's Houthi militants in the Red Sea last week has sunk, salvagers confirmed on Wednesday.

The vessel was struck with missiles and an explosive-laden remote-controlled boat, according to sources.

International naval forces have been deployed to provide mainly defensive support for ships still sailing through the Red Sea, but the attacks have increased significantly.

Insurance industry sources said on Wednesday there was also mounting concern over the use of attack drone boats by the Houthis.

"They are harder to defend against and potentially more lethal as they strike the waterline," one industry source said.

"Missiles have - to date - mainly caused deck and superstructure damage (to ships)."

There have been 10 Houthi strikes so far in June compared with five in May, said Munro Anderson, head of operations at marine war risk and insurance specialist Vessel Protect, part of Pen Underwriting. "The first successful use of an unmanned surface vessel represents a new challenge for commercial shipping within an already complex environment," he added.

Insurance industry sources said that additional war risk premiums, paid when vessels sail through the Red Sea, had hovered close to 0.7% of the value of a ship in recent days from around 1% earlier this year.

They added that with a second ship sinking and the losses likely to emerge from that, rates are likely to firm up, adding hundreds of thousands of dollars of extra costs to every voyage.

Ships must divert around southern Africa, which is the best way to protect seafarers, said Stephen Cotton, General Secretary with the International Transport Workers' Federation, the leading seafarer's union.

"We would also welcome proper escorts and the shielding of ships by naval forces, which would reduce the risks of ships being hit," he added.



Aswat Asharq Al-Awsat : US, SKorea Sign Joint Nuclear Deterrence Guidelines in Face of NKorean Threats

South Korea's President Yoon Suk Yeol attends a session of the NATO summit with Indo-Pacific Partners Thursday July 11, 2024, in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
South Korea's President Yoon Suk Yeol attends a session of the NATO summit with Indo-Pacific Partners Thursday July 11, 2024, in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
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US, SKorea Sign Joint Nuclear Deterrence Guidelines in Face of NKorean Threats

South Korea's President Yoon Suk Yeol attends a session of the NATO summit with Indo-Pacific Partners Thursday July 11, 2024, in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)
South Korea's President Yoon Suk Yeol attends a session of the NATO summit with Indo-Pacific Partners Thursday July 11, 2024, in Washington. (AP Photo/Jacquelyn Martin)

The US and South Korea signed joint nuclear deterrence guidelines for the first time, a basic yet important step in their efforts to improve deterrence toward North Korea's evolving nuclear threats.

Meeting Thursday on the sidelines of a NATO summit in Washington, President Joe Biden and South Korean President Yoon Suk Yeol commended what they called “the tremendous progress” that their countries’ alliance have made a year after creating a joint Nuclear Consultative Group.

The two leaders authorized “the US-ROK Guidelines for Nuclear Deterrence and Nuclear Operations on the Korean Peninsula” that was signed by their defense officials earlier Thursday, according to South Korea’s presidential office. ROK stands for the Republic of Korea, South Korea’s official name.

Last year, the US and South Korea launched the consultative body to strengthen communication on nuclear operations and discuss how to integrate US nuclear weapons and South Korean conventional weapons in various contingencies. The US has long promised to use all its capabilities, including nuclear weapons, to defend South Korea if it is attacked, but faced suspicions that it lacks plans on how it would exercise its extended deterrence for its Asian ally.

The consultative body was established as North Korea has sharply accelerated its missile testing activities and openly threatened to use nuclear weapons preemptively in potential conflicts, The Associated Press reported. South Korea has no nuclear weapons.

“The presidents underscored that the Guidelines document provides a solid foundation for enhancing US-ROK extended deterrence cooperation in an integrated manner," said a joint statement by Biden and Yoon.